I Hate Lucy

Don’t get me wrong. I used to laugh my head off at Lucy Ricardo’s shenanigans on the “I Love Lucy” show. But, let’s face it, that show may be at the roots of the culture of lying that has emerged in this country, especially off late. The humor on that show was based, almost without exception, on the deception and lies that Lucy perpetrated against Ricky. As a result of those lies she had her hilarious comeuppance, and all was well in the end. In any event, so many sit-come that have followed have adopted the same template: tell lies that generate embarrassing, funny situations and make sure the hero or heroine learns a lesson or two but all comes out in the wash at the end.

So what? Well, think about it. The entertainment industry has taken over this country and folks spend the better part of their day and night watching the tube. Sit-coms are extremely popular. If we put two and two together and make sure we don’t come up with five, we might infer that those shows permeate the tiny cells in our brains and plant seeds (if television waves can plant seeds). And those seeds give us the deep impression that lying is OK. We see it time after time on the tube. We know that the used car salesman lies to us. It’s a given. We know that going in and brace ourselves for the tall tales about the car we like driven by an old women and never over 30 miles an hour. And we know the man selling his house will simply not mention that the basement leaks every time it rains.

Politicians lie to us and we know it as well. It’s a given, just like the used car salesman, the house-seller, and whoever else has an item to sell. The politicians in particular are selling themselves and they will tell us what we want to hear in order to get our vote. We say we hate politics; perhaps it is because we all know that it invariably involves lying. One of the two candidates for president in the current race is the Champion of Liars. A recent count by the folks at the New York Times reveals that in a given week he told 87 lies to his opponent’s 8. Clearly, he is the Champion! But the fact remains that his opponent lies on occasion as well. Perhaps it is best to take what they all say with a grain of salt, as they say, and assume that we are being lied to all over the place.

The problem is that we need to know where those folks stand. We need to now if the car we buy will hold up after the warranty runs out and whether or not the leak in the basement can be stopped. We need to know these things and when we are told lies and we believe those lies we are the victims. How do we avoid that trap? Surely, we have some responsibility to learn the truth and separate that from the rest of the verbal detritus that spews forth from the mouths of those we would like to believe.

As I have noted in a previous post, when lies become the norm there is no longer any truth. Truth becomes whatever we choose to believe. I do think we have arrived at that point as a society. How else to explain the thousands of people who buy the swill that is being sold by the Champion of Liars? So many of us have become like the naive fools who bought snake oil from the man on the wagon at the fair years ago. There’s a fool born every day. Sometimes dozens of fools. How do we make sure we are not among them?

To begin with, we need to be suspicious about anything a politician tells us. We need to insist on corroboration from another source when a claim is made, a reliable source. We need to ask ourselves whether what he or she says is plausible? Does it make sense? Can the president, for example, have the power to accomplish all the things this particular candidate is claiming he or she will accomplish when in office? What evidence do we have that what this person says is true or that they are competent to hold that office?

The rule of thumb in critical thinking is that truth is a residue. If we can find a weakness in a claim, if we can find counter-evidence, that claim is almost certainly not true. A claim is true if, and only if, we cannot find reasons to reject it. This was the Socratic method and it has stood the test of time. But it takes work. It requires that we be suspicious. It takes careful attention to the claims themselves and a willingness to think through what the person says and reject those claims that are clearly false — even if they fit in nicely with our preconceived ideas. And that is tough. We do want to think that those claims are true that make us feel good about ourselves. But a claim is not true simply because we want to believe it. It is only true if it cannot possibly be false.

Ricky believed Lucy because he loved her and he wanted to believe what she said was true. He should have given it a bit more thought. But it wouldn’t have been half as funny. On the political stage these days, however, it is not the least bit funny and we have our work cut out for us.

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3 thoughts on “I Hate Lucy

  1. Hugh, when the lies become so engrained, they replace the truth. And, when so-called news organizations don’t question, embellish or further the lies, they get even more engrained. Fox News and the fossil fuel industry have perpetuated the climate change is a hoax argument for years, but that is lie and Exxon Mobil is being investigated for alleged misrepresentation to its shareholders of the impact of climate change on its business, which is securities fraud if found guilty.

    As you note, Trump lies over 70% of the time in this election, per Politifacts. Thomas Wells, an attorney who worked for Trump for years, says Trump lies all of the time. So, it is more than taking what he says with a grain of salt. The odds are in your favor to not believe a word he says.

    This is why it frustrates me when Clinton slips up and lies or is not forthcoming. She does not need to and when she does it feeds the legend or caricature that has been built over time. If you tell most people that Clinton lies far less than Trump, people don’t believe you, even if the data supports your argument. That is how large the legend is.

    My favorite Socratic question to ask of Trump is as follows. You say the unemployment rate is 42%. Yet, there are 50 governors, many Republican and some running for office, who are touting how they got the unemployment rate to 4%, 5% or 6%. Since the national unemployment rate is a compilation of 50 states unemployment, either you are lying or 50 governors are lying. Which is it?

    Great post. Ricky sure had a big heart for Lucy as she had to do a lot of “splainin.”

    Keith

    • I feel the same way about Clinton. Perhaps her lies are merely falsehoods, inaccurate information she puts out there when she is unsure of her facts? But, on the whole, I think she has run a rather shoddy campaign and if Trump weren’t a born loser she would have a serious problem winning.

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